28 Fiber Dissection of the Brain



10.1055/b-0037-146653

28 Fiber Dissection of the Brain


Kaan Yağmurlu



Lateral to Medial Dissection

Fig. 28.1. Lateral view of the left cerebral cortex.
Fig. 28.2. Lateral view of the left hemisphere. The gray matter (cortex) has been removed while preserving the pre- and postcentral gyri.
Fig. 28.3. Lateral view of the left hemisphere. The insular cortex has been exposed.
Fig. 28.4. Lateral view of the left hemisphere. The insular cortex has been removed to expose the extreme capsule, while preserving the circular sulcus of insula.
Fig. 28.5. Lateral view of the left hemisphere. Removal of the extreme capsule exposes the external capsule and claustrum.
Fig. 28.6. Lateral view of the left hemisphere. Some fibers of the external capsule have been removed to expose the putamen.
Fig. 28.7. Lateral view of the left hemisphere. The dorsal external capsule and posterior half of the putamen have been removed to expose the globus pallidus and internal capsule. The external and internal capsules come together to form the corona radiata.
Fig. 28.8. Lateral view of the left hemisphere. The putamen has been removed to expose the whole internal capsule and anterior commissure. The removal of the superior longitudinal fasciculus (association fibers) exposes the corona radiata (projection fibers).
Fig. 28.9. Lateral view of the left hemisphere. Part of the anterior commissure fibers have been removed to expose the optic radiation fibers. The centrum semiovale is formed by association, projection, and commissural fibers above the level of the corpus callosum.
Fig. 28.10. Lateral view of the left hemisphere. The caudate head, body, and tail have been exposed. The ependyma covers the lateral wall of the lateral ventricle, and the tapetum covers the atrium, occipital and temporal horns.
Fig. 28.11. Lateral view of the left hemisphere. The ependyma and tapetum have been removed to expose the parts of the lateral ventricle.
Fig. 28.12. Lateral view of the left hemisphere. The basal ganglia structures have been exposed in the insular area.
Fig. 28.13. Lateral view of the left hemisphere. The callosal fibers have been removed to expose the cingulum.
Fig. 28.14. Lateral view, left side. The Papez circuit has been exposed.


Medial to Lateral Dissection

Fig. 28.15. Medial view of the left cerebral hemisphere. The cingulate cortex has been preserved while the removing the gray matter (cortex).
Fig. 28.16. Enlarged medial view of the left parahippocampal gyrus.
Fig. 28.17. Medial view of the left cerebral hemisphere. The cortex has been removed to expose the white matter of the hemisphere. The midbrain has also been dissected to expose the red nucleus
Fig. 28.18. Medial view of the left cerebral hemisphere. The cingulate cortex and parahippocampal cortex have been removed to expose the cingulum and dentate gyrus.
Fig. 28.19. Medial view of the left cerebral hemisphere. After removal of the short association fibers of the medial hemisphere, the callosal fibers can be seen. The thalamus has been removed.
Fig. 28.20. Medial view of the left cerebral hemisphere. The cingulum has been removed to expose the dentate gyrus.
Fig. 28.21. Medial view of the left cerebral hemisphere. The corpus callosum has been removed to expose the Papez circuit.

Only gold members can continue reading. Log In or Register to continue

May 23, 2020 | Posted by in NEUROSURGERY | Comments Off on 28 Fiber Dissection of the Brain
Premium Wordpress Themes by UFO Themes